Baltic Studies Program

Baltic Flags Twitter.png

Baltic Studies Program

The Baltic States—their history, culture, politics, and people—continue to play a central role in the history and politics of the rise, fall, and resurrection of Soviet communism. Studying the Baltic States provides insight into the history and nature of Soviet imperialism, the politics and sociology of post-communist democratization, and the contemporary geopolitical struggle to extend and maintain freedom across the globe.

That is why the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation recently launched our Baltic Studies Program, which will include support for two ten-month, residential research fellowships and related publications and events in Washington, DC.

The goal of the program is to engage leading experts—from economists to historians, from diplomats to journalists, from administration officials to lawmakers—in a discussion of the history of communism and anti-communism in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, post-communist transition, and the character and importance of Baltic-American relations. 

 

Baltic Fellows: Who are we looking for?

The ideal candidate for this non-residential, ten-month appointment will be a national from one of the Baltic states who holds a degree in economics, political economy, political science, history, or a related discipline (graduate education highly preferred); has a portfolio of well written research projects and/or papers in the area of 20th century or contemporary Baltic history, Baltic economic or national security policy, or Baltic-American relations; possesses a professional demeanor; and a commitment to educating people about the history of communism and dangers of collectivism. Excellent English language skills (both written and verbal) are required.

See the full listing on our Careers page.

Polish Studies Program

Poland Flag Twitter.png

Polish Studies Program

The 20th and 21st century history of Poland can be seen as a microcosm of Western history: it is the story of freedom’s suppression by the imperial forces of Nazism and Communism and liberty’s eventual rebirth. As such, understanding Polish history can help us to understand how these competing totalitarian movements sought to suppress the free individual and how free government can be reestablished in their wake, as well as how liberty must be defended against the ideas and forces of tyranny.

To promote such understanding, the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation proposes the establishment of a Polish Studies Program (in partnership with the Polish National Foundation), consisting of two ten-month, residential research fellowships and related publications and events, as well as the convening of a Polish Studies conference.

Polish Fellows: who are we looking for?

The ideal candidate for the position of Senior Research Fellow will be a Polish national who holds an advanced degree in economics, political economy, political science, history, or a related discipline (doctorate preferred), or possesses equivalent professional or administrative experience; is an internationally recognized expert in the area of 20th century or contemporary Polish history, Polish economic or national security policy, or Polish-American relations; is able to represent Foundation judgment; possesses a professional demeanor and a commitment to educating people about the history of communism and dangers of collectivism. Excellent English language skills (both written and verbal) are required.

See the full listing on our Careers page.