Why The Chinese Communist Party Is Scared Of #MeToo

Just a few months ago, the #MeToo movement erupted, spreading across the globe and changing the face of feminism. Millions of women took their stories to the social media stage, calling for an end to silence on the discrimination and abuse they had suffered because of their gender. Women in the workplace, academia, and even in the media joined hands in sharing their narratives and airing their oppressions. It’s no wonder a movement of this scale seeped into even the most guarded countries.

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Interview With a Young Venezuelan Exile

Wuilly Arteaga is a young Venezuelan violinist who attracted worldwide attention for playing his music in the midst of Venezuela’s massive 2017 anti-government protests. In retaliation, government forces destroyed his violin and arrested and tortured him. Wuilly is now one of the approximately three million Venezuelans who have left their country to escape its authoritarian regime. During a recent trip to Washington, Wuilly sat down with Dissident to discuss his activism and the experience of the Venezuelan diaspora.

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Why Was There No Nuremberg for Communism?

Everyone is familiar with the Nuremberg Trials that were convened in 1945 to prosecute the crimes of Nazi Germany. The trials served as a final day of reckoning for the violent and destructive Nazi ideology that had wreaked havoc on Europe for more than a decade. Considering how deadly the ideology of communism proved to be in Eastern Europe, Russia, and elsewhere, why has there never been a similar trial for the crimes committed by the communist regime in the Soviet Union? This was the question raised by Vladimir Bukovsky.

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Janina BeckComment
This Czech Feminist Fought Nazis, Communists, and the Patriarchy

“If the Western media had a more plausible scale of values, Milada Horáková’s name would be well known, rather than virtually unknown in the West,” writes the Czech Jewish historian Wilma Abeles Iggers. "Jailed by the Nazis during most of the Second World War, she barely escaped execution, was probably the most prominent woman activist after the war, was again jailed and this time executed by the Communists in 1950, despite many telegrams of protest by world leaders.”

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MLK’S Message Of Justice Echoes Today

“We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor,” wrote the Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Junior in his 1963 Letter From A Birmingham Jail. “It must be demanded by the oppressed.” Dr. King took his place in the American pantheon for a life lived with unshakable devotion to the principles of freedom, justice, and the God-given right of all human beings to live their lives free from the fetters of oppression and servitude. 

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DissidentComment
Women of the Gulag

Hoover Institution scholar Paul Gregory gives the bulk of Stalin’s survivors their due by preserving the stories of five Soviet women—Fekla, Maria, Adile, Agnessa, and Evgenia—whose memories span dekulakization, the Great Terror, and post-Stalin rehabilitation. Each of these women came from different social classes and regions, but none of them escaped persecution under the Stalin regime.

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Communism: A Bad Idea Even in 1844

It may be slightly odd and amusing to think of Marx in his mid-twenties living in Paris as the editor of a magazine. Digging into the letters and writings that Marx produced in those years, and the writings of those who knew him, always turns up something interesting—and occasionally something utterly fascinating.

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Joshua DillComment
Chekhov’s Gun: The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact in the Baltics

The history of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact is better known today, in part thanks to international commemoration events like Black Ribbon Day. But the story of how the Baltic peoples discovered the secret protocols that prescribed their subjugation to the Soviet Union is less known. It is a story imbued with the tragic irony of Chekhov’s gun: the very document that spelled out the Soviet occupation of the Baltics also triggered the collapse of the Soviet Union.

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Formosa: From Beautiful Island to Ugly Nightmare

Formosa and the Vietnamese state are playing the waiting game. They hope that in time the collective memory of the disaster will fade away. They will continue to persecute, imprison, repress, and silence those who dare to speak out, and hope to keep the public both at home and abroad unaware.

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Nancy BuiComment
Liu Xiaobo, 1955–2017

Throughout his life, Liu Xiaobo was many things: a professor, a critic of literature, an author, an activist, a husband, a poet, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, a prisoner, and a tireless advocate for the freedom of the Chinese people.

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DissidentComment
Made in China, in a Labor Camp

while any given American consumer can find an item in their desk drawer stamped with the words “Made in China,” they might be completely ignorant of the circumstance under which they are produced. One woman in Arizona, however, recently received a startling glimpse into the life of a Chinese forced laborer.

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